quarry

Monoliths, Megaliths, and Ancient Quarries – Easter Island

Polynesians living on Easter Island (Rapa Nui) carved enormous stylized human figures known as moai thousands of years after ancient societies built the Stonehenge and Egyptian monuments. Easter Island, formed by three volcanoes that rose out of the sea, contains a variety of volcanic rocks. The ancient carvers carefully selected rocks and carved their statues between about 1250 and 1500 CE. Nearly 900 of the moai can be seen on the island today.

By |2024-06-10T07:12:11-07:00October 14th, 2023|Our Amazing Earth|2 Comments

Monoliths, Megaliths, and Ancient Quarries—Stonehenge

Ancient people made circular arrangements of enormous stones at Stonehenge beginning around 5,000 years ago in the southern part of modern England. Compared with other ancient megalithic monuments in Europe, Stonehenge is unique for the great distances that the builders moved blocks. Archaeologists have shown that quarry locations for some multi-ton blocks are about 140 mi (225 km) distant.

By |2024-06-10T07:12:39-07:00October 3rd, 2023|Our Amazing Earth|4 Comments

Monoliths, Megaliths, and Ancient Quarries—Egypt

For thousands of years, ancient people collected and transported enormous rocks from quarries to carve their gigantic statues and shape blocks for pyramids, temples, and other monumental structures. The ancient Egyptians are particularly renowned for their work with massive blocks. They used around 200 different quarries over 3,000 years, and worked sandstone, limestone, basalt, granites, and many other types of rocks .

By |2024-06-10T07:13:49-07:00September 28th, 2023|Ancient Andean Cultures, Our Amazing Earth|4 Comments

Ancient Metals and Ancient Mines – Part 1

Rich deposits of metals, created by the dynamic geologic environment that built the rugged Andes Mountains, became intertwined with Andean cultures in the New World. The Incas and their ancestors created metal products primarily for aesthetic uses and for religious goods. This contrasts with Old World cultures, where the emphasis was on the mechanical properties of metals -- strength, hardness and sharpness—for tools and weapons.

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